New On The Blog

When attending a party, there are certain expectations we have of our hostess. We will enjoy and appreciate everything she has done, but we do assume there will be food and drinks. We would also like a clean bathroom and a home that does not smell like the local pet store. What some people forget is there are also expectations of the guest.

Giving a party, of any type, requires a great deal of work. If you have been fortunate enough to be included in a festive soiree, it is nice to arrive with a gift for the hostess. The typical present will cost between $15-$30, but there are less expensive things you can find at the local discount store.

Attire: Shabby Chic; Razzle Dazzle; Cowboy Couture


WHAT????

Word to hostesses: when listing the attire on the invitation for your party, make it clear. Do not let your creative thoughts have you writing a description that requires an interpreter.  We do not want to force our guests to solve a riddle to understand what is expected of them. There is a phrase I like to quote, “To be unclear is to be unkind.”

There is something special we feel when we receive an invitation. It is the anticipation of a celebration, the excitement of choosing what to wear, but more importantly, it is the affirmation that tells us, “I was chosen!” We know a hostess has responsibilities to ensure her party is a success, but did you know there are expectations of the guests? And your first job begins when you receive an invitation that says RSVP.

Do you believe there is a creator behind this painting, or did it create itself? I believe if I polled 1,000 people, 100% would say, “Of course, there is a creator. That’s common sense.” Do you believe there is a Creator behind this picture? If I polled 1,000 people with the same question, stats show I would not receive 100% agreement that there was a Creator behind this picture.

People are returning to work, which means many of us will be navigating changes that would otherwise seem mundane. Elevator etiquette? Did you know there was such a thing? Below are 9 basic reminders when riding the lift. I have thrown in a few exceptions while we live in a COVID world. 

Throughout history we have seen God place people in power that made us say, “What is He thinking?” Yet God clearly reminds us in Isaiah that the way He thinks is far beyond what we can sometimes understand. In a child’s eyes, a parent giving her yucky medicine when she already feels poorly can seem cruel. “Why would Mommy make me take this?” The child lives in her “here and now” moment of life, yet the parent sees the big picture. The mother knows what is best for the child, even when the child does not understand. 

Our 4-part series on living as Christians in a political world was written in response to questions I have been receiving on knowing how to separate truth from lies, when to engage in our political system, and the most effective way to stay informed. In Part 1 we learned the biblical formula for seeking truth. In Part 2 we discussed the importance of knowing your foundation. In this post, Part 3, I will provide you with 7 practical tips I use to find truth in our news driven world. 

We are living in a time where many do not know who or what to believe. It seems our national 24-hour news media seeks ratings more than they seek truth (regardless of which way their bias leans). Many journalists receive bonuses based on how many clicks their story receives, and companies earn more advertising revenue if they can show a high click-through rate on articles. It has become too common to read endless bait-and-switch headlines.

“How do I know what is real? How do I know truth when I see it? I want to stay informed, but where do I turn when I feel every news source is somehow deceiving me?”


Giving you tips on hosting a Halloween party during COVID is sure easier than tackling subjects on news, politics, and finding truth. Yet these are the questions filling my inbox. 

Does this blog seem early? Did you know we only have 10 weeks before we move into December? It is time to start planning!
1. Decide how much you can spend. If you have a $500 budget and 10 people you need to give gifts, then you can only spend $50 a person.

Halloween in 2020 will be different than past years, but there are still ways to enjoy this festive start to the holiday season. This blog may seem early, but October 31st is only 7 weeks away! It is time to start planning. Below are my top 10 ideas for a jovial and happy start to your fall celebrations.

Decor Ideas:
1. Use a decorative wine bucket filled with flowers as your table centerpiece. This works if you have a separate table where you will place the food. If the wine tasting is conducted at one table where your guests are sitting, then you need lower height decorations where everyone can see over the arrangements. Use wine glasses randomly placed down the table with sprigs of flowers in them. 

  • Lisa Lou

A Woman’s Influence on Her Family



(Left to Right): Christopher and Lisa Zook. Cecelia and Christopher Zook, Jr. (And Colonel! Louie didn’t make the cut. He was too squirmy.)


“When I was a young man, I wanted to change the world. I found it was difficult to change the world, so I tried to change my nation. When I found I could not change the nation, I began to focus on my town. I could not change the town, so I tried to change my family. Now, as an old man, I realize the only thing I can change is myself, and suddenly I realize that if long ago I had changed myself, I could have made an impact on my family. My family and I could have made an impact on our town. Their impact could have changed the nation and I could indeed have changed the world.” –An Unknown Monk (1100 A.D.)

Learning to juggle responsibilities of a career, volunteer duties, friendships, and family can be a herculean task. As we navigate adult life, we need to remind ourselves our activities outside our family should not cause us to neglect our responsibilities to our family. As women, it is a top priority to protect the interests of those under our protection, and the most sacred place we do this is within the 4 walls where we live. As the unknown Monk said, if we can create healthy families, we can change the world.

My husband and I mentor newly married couples, and we notice most brides catch something from each other. It is called the nesting bug. Sharing the same season of life with other ladies elevates this gathering instinct, but I am here to state, the desire to nest is very real. God has placed this in our hearts, and it should not be ignored. Proverbs 31 is often quoted as an example of the godly woman. One of the verses shows how she effectively cares for her family.

Lisa Lou’s maternal great grandparents.


As we begin to build our homes, the responsibilities can seem overwhelming. We look for guidance in our moms or grandmothers, but often wonder, “How did she do it?” We need to give ourselves a little break, because the examples we watch in our mentors are of ladies that have been on the job for many years. They, too, learned through trial and error.

With fulltime careers, many women struggle to balance what the perception of family life should be verses reality. The Instagram pictures and Pinterest boards of designer homes flood our minds. We envision 5-star homecooked meals. Our perfect ending to a long day is settling down with our recently betrothed to unwind with a glass of wine while sharing experiences from our day and dreaming about the 1.5 children we will one day call our own. As an empty nester married more than 3 decades, I can confidently say this perfect scenario is rare.

A more realistic day looks like this: Traffic causes you to arrive home late so the dog did not have his routine potty break. You are greeted at the door with a pile of poo you barely step over while at the same time realizing you forgot to thaw the chicken for tonight’s dinner. You can either eat late or order take-out…again. The laundry you put in the dryer before leaving for work is still wet, leaving the clothes wrinkled. They will require extra ironing. If you have children, they are starved for your attention. You hand off the crying baby to your husband when he arrives home (he was late, too) so you can help little Johnny with his homework. After everyone is fed, bathed, and in bed, you have a few minutes to yourself, but you are so tired, you close your eyes, drift off to sleep, and dream about the “perfect” home life you are determined to create.

When the honeymoon is over, the routine of life takes hold, and responsibilities begin to pile up. Women can feel overwhelmed with family life and what they perceive it takes to manage a godly home. They can also feel pressure from the outside world that tells them other pursuits (more important agendas) should fill their time. It becomes an internal game of tug-of-war. This is when we stop, take a breath, realign our priorities, and remind ourselves family and home are designed by God to be the primary place we meet our needs. And as wives and moms, we are part of the lifeblood that flows through our family.

Homes should be a refuge from the world. It is the place we need to feel safe and loved. It is where we learn, grow, and establish relationships. When the home is a place of protection, it will successfully serve as ground zero. It will become a place to teach and train our families, where we grow and learn, where we share laughter, sorrows, play games, struggle through homework, and engage in disagreements and arguments. Home is where we shape the personalities and beliefs of our children and learn to become partners with our spouse. It is where we heal the sick, nourish our bodies, and celebrate milestones. The Oxford dictionary states, “Home is where something flourishes.” Simply put, the home is where we “do life.” The influence a woman yields in her house is powerful as she creates, guides, and leads the personality of her family. God has placed us in a position of honor and authority, but it comes with responsibility, and it should not be taken lightly.

Although that yearning desire to establish our families and our home can lead to attention distracting pursuits of beautiful furniture, top notch appliances, and impeccable landscaping, it is important we remember our homes are to be used to minister to our families, and the physical building in which we dwell should not be seen as the ultimate goal in creating our storybook life. If we do this, we will have turned those four walls into an idol that replaces the purpose of home.

Whether you are the main provider, a single mother, or the always-on-the-go volunteer, it is important to remember our priority is within our family. No one can serve two masters, and as a modern woman living in the world, we must never lose sight of this fact.

To make sure there is no misunderstanding, becoming the embodiment of Martha Stewart is not required to have healthy and functioning families. Nor should it be our goal (unless you are naturally gifted in this way). I rarely cook, I do not enjoy yard work, and I will NOT pick up dead bugs in my house! What I can do, though, is provide a refuge for my family, create a place for them to grow and learn, and equip them with the tools they need to face the challenges of the world. I can prepare my children to stand on their own, and I can be a partner with my husband.

I can also work to make our home a place of hospitality for others. These four walls in which we live may not be ideal. Our dinners might be burned, our bedrooms left messy, but love of family covers up a lot of mistakes. When our children leave home, they will not remember if their 5th birthday party was perfect. In fact, they probably will not remember it at all. What they will remember is the love you poured into them and the legacy they will carry in their hearts of a godly woman they call blessed.

Together with you,

Lisa Lou

Get rid of the noise in your life. Join Lisa Lou and receive commonsense, faith-based advice for the modern woman.

© 2020 Lisa Lou by Kaio

  • Facebook
  • Instagram
  • Pinterest
  • Spotify