New On The Blog

A toast may be offered in any setting and made to an individual or a group. Increase your confidence at your next social gathering by learning the ins and outs of this ancient tradition. Toasting to someone’s health or honor goes back to biblical times and can be found in most cultures including the Egyptians, Greeks, and Persians.

We could spend hours diving into every aspect of table do’s and don’ts, but I want to give you my top 13 tips that will help you navigate any social or business gathering with confidence.

When God knitted together our precious children before they were even born, I am convinced he also wove in their personalities, gifts, and a love language! The concept of “love languages” is that each of us expresses and receives love in a unique way. The five love languages identified by Gary Chapman in his bestselling book are: Touch, Words of Affirmation, Acts of Service, Quality Time, and Gifts.

When God knitted together our precious children before they were even born, I am convinced he also wove in their personalities, gifts, and a love language! The concept of “love languages” is that each of us expresses and receives love in a unique way. The five love languages identified by Gary Chapman in his bestselling book are: Touch, Words of Affirmation, Acts of Service, Quality Time, and Gifts.

Vacations are back on the calendar, and many people are crossing the country through our friendly skies. I thought a refresher on airport and plane travel might do us all a little good.

I heard the most interesting ad the other day. There is a company that offers private-type flights for the commercial world. They describe themselves as a “hop on jet service.” On their website it states, “The convenience of private air but at commercial prices.” I looked them up, and there was one flight from Dallas to Houston for only $99!

“Conflict is part of every marriage. Thirty-seven percent of newlyweds admit to being more critical of their mates after marriage. And 30 percent report an increase in arguments. Whether you argue does not determine the health of your marriage. Far more important than how often you argue is how you argue.

With Father’s Day coming soon, you and your family will be celebrating one of the most important men in your life- Dad. As a child, he was your hero, your protector, and your solid rock. Now that you are older, you admire him for all that he has done for you and you still look to him for advice and wisdom. Picking out the perfect gift for Dad is not easy!

School is almost out for summer! Many of us want to gift our child’s teacher something special at the end of the year for all the love, kindness, and patience they have poured out on our little ones. Being a teacher is not easy, and they are so deserving of our gratitude especially after this wild 20/21 school year! Some common go-to gifts you might have thought of are bath and body products, Starbucks gift cards and mugs, but below are some additional gift ideas your child’s teacher will be touched to receive:

School is almost out for summer! Many of us want to gift our child’s teacher something special at the end of the year for all the love, kindness, and patience they have poured out on our little ones. Being a teacher is not easy, and they are so deserving of our gratitude especially after this wild 20/21 school year! Some common go-to gifts you might have thought of are bath and body products, Starbucks gift cards and mugs, but below are some additional gift ideas your child’s teacher will be touched to receive:

Graduation is a pivotal point in a young person’s life. It is the beginning of a season of responsibility, coming of age, and independence. As these twenty-somethings are about to discover the meaning of “adulting,” here are some gift ideas that will no doubt be a blessing in your college grad’s new life.

If some of you are thinking, “I believe I have read this letter before,” you would be correct. Our son and daughter (in law) had a beautiful wedding ceremony planned for April of 2020. As with thousands around the country, they had to postpone the big event, but chose to hold a private covenant ceremony in our backyard. Well, we are finally celebrating their wedding vows, and it was on my heart to re-post the letter I wrote to my son last year. Some things have changed (he is now 25, not 24 as the letter states), but I hope you enjoy!

 I heard the most interesting ad the other day. There is a company that offers private-type flights for the commercial world. They describe themselves as a “hop on jet service.” On their website it states, “The convenience of private air but at commercial prices.” I looked them up, and there was one flight from Dallas to Houston for only $99! 

“We read a lot of articles and books about how to get through the engagement process, but no one ever talked to us about what it would be like the first year of our marriage. I wish we had known what to expect,” said one of the couples my husband and I mentor. This is a common comment, and if you find yourself having similar feelings, do not fret! You are not alone. The first year of marriage is fabulous, but it can also be difficult. Two people learning to become one does not happen overnight.

We all like to think we have good manners in marriage, but with the people that are closest to us, we can sometimes find ourselves slipping a bit. As stated by Cindy Grosso of the Charleston School of Protocol, manners are not about a bunch of rules. Manners are the outward manifestation of the condition of our heart. If we have a heart that loves, honors, respects, and cherishes our spouse, then these traits will show in how we behave.

Society is opening and people are resuming long overdue vacations. This is great news! I recently posted some tips on making your travels successful, but let’s focus on dos and don’ts of traveling with friends.

 

1. Boundaries: When traveling with others, set guidelines, boundaries, and expectations before leaving town. If you know you and your husband want one night to yourselves, express this up front. If a quiet breakfast in bed is necessary to start your day, see if this fits with the group’s schedule. 

  • Lisa Lou

A Holiday Survival Guide: Be Intentional




I recently bumped into a friend at the store, and as we began talking, she expressed how she struggles with the holidays. When January rolls around, she feels like she somehow “missed out.” I understand this feeling because I, too, have often felt this way. Life was so busy with the preparation of celebration, that I missed the joy that awaited each of us this time of year.


In life, there are two approaches people take. They either let life happen to them, or they make life happen for them. When it comes to this busy season, people apply the same way of thinking. They let the holidays happen to them, or they make the holidays happen for them. If you want to wake up January 1st and not feel as though you missed out, it starts by being intentional in your approach to this time of year. Even in a COVID world, do not let the whirlwind control you.


How do we do this? Start by asking yourself, “What is my vision of the ideal holiday?” Make a wish list. Are you searching for the romantic stories we watch on the Hallmark Channel? Is it gathering your closest friends for a cookie swap, or maybe a funny ornament exchange? Maybe your ideal Christmas activity is spending the day in your flannel pajamas, curled up on the couch, reading a book.


Ask yourself what will bring joy to you this season and what will make you sad if certain activities do not occur. This helps clarify your expectations. Unless you can define what you want, you will not be able to turn your dreams into a reality. Taking control of the holidays begins with a wish list, followed by planning and execution.


I began implementing this practice about 10 years ago, and it has greatly increased my joy and happiness when it comes to celebrating the season. Here is an example of my personal list.



Things I dream about for Christmas and things I will miss if they do not occur:

Attend a theatre performance

Celebrate Christmas Eve service at church with my family

Take a night to drive around and look at Christmas lights

Dinner out with a group of longtime friends

Host a dinner party at the house

A day of service at a charitable organization

Night with husband watching old Christmas cartoons

Day of rest in my plaid pajamas (a “do-nothing” day)


This may seem like a big list, but I usually am able to check everything off by New Year’s Eve. I had to learn to be flexible, though, and in a year like 2020, I also need to be creative. I live in the 4th largest city in the United States. For us, the problem can become not in a lack of activities, but an overabundance of activities. Though things seem a little quieter this year, I am still experiencing the chaos that December brings. But I have written the important activities down, and when things come up that are not on my list, I find it easy to say no.


While you are brainstorming, ask yourself what causes you anxiety during the holidays. Find your stressor points and figure out a way to control this. This is a silly example (and has nothing to do with Christmas), but it is what I think of when it comes to controlling my stress. I do not like shots. As a little girl I would start crying before we reached the pediatrician’s office door. As an adult, I avoided the flu vaccine because of this same fear. I finally had a conversation with myself. “Ok, Lisa Lou, what is your stressor here? I do not like shots. Ok, how can I still reach my end goal but eliminate the stress of the shot?” Guess what? I solved my problem. I started using numbing cream! Yes, this might sound juvenile, but I live by the philosophy that I will not let life happen to me. I will make life happen for me. Since I began using numbing cream, I am faithful with my injections, and I have eliminated my stress!


The holidays can be filled with tension due to gift buying, activities, and even the normal daily grind. In a pandemic world where we must deploy an extra amount of creativity, our nerves can be on edge. There are ways around this, but you must first define what is causing you to feel frazzled. Spend a few minutes analyzing where your anxiety is coming from, then develop a plan to reduce or eliminate these items.


Are there certain people that are causing you a problem? If so, figure out a way to reduce your exposure to them (which might not be hard in 2020!). If it is truly a toxic relationship, take a friend with you when you see that person, or stay away all together. Healthy individuals know how to put boundaries around themselves for their own self-preservation.


Is your stress emanating from the thought of overseeing Christmas dinner? If so, delegate. Once the family Christmas meal moved to my house when I was a young adult, my husband and I assigned all responsibility for the side dishes to family members. The only thing we provided was the turkey, drinks, and a welcoming place to eat. Christmas Day became one of the least stressful times in December once we implemented this design.


Side note: To be successful at delegating requires an ability to let go. If you hand out the responsibilities, be appreciative for whatever your guests bring. If Cousin Jack is in charge of dessert and brings prepackaged cookies from the local discount store, say thank you, and let it go. It is not important. If the choice is between you spending more time in the kitchen or enjoying the holidays with less stress, I am opting for less stress.


If an overtaxed schedule is what is causing your anxiety, do not accept every invitation that comes your way. If you follow my blog, you have heard me say repeatedly it is perfectly acceptable to decline an invitation, even when your calendar is clear. Do not let others control you, you control you.


If you receive an invitation for an activity the week before Christmas, and you know it is going to be crazy busy, then decline the invitation. Give yourself permission to take a break. This is one reason I calendar “stay in my pajamas all day.” I make an actual appointment with myself. There is nothing worse than feeling like you wasted a day, but if you planned on wasting the day, then you are fulfilling your obligation and you do not feel guilty. (And I would argue that a day of rest where you do not get out of your PJs can recharge your battery in a way not much else can). Protect your calendar. Protect your boundaries.


Traditions are wonderful, but life brings constant change. I think most of us have learned to be more flexible in 2020, and this is a good trait to master. If you are too rigid you will set yourself up for disappointment. My most important reminder this year? Do not let your circumstances define your happiness. There are many annual activities that will not take place, but this brings opportunity to pivot and create new traditions. How am I implementing some of my wish list this season?


Attend a theatre performance: This year my husband and I downloaded a theatrical murder mystery radio show from one of our local theatres (the A.D. Players), curled up on the couch, lit a fire, and enjoyed a “who dunnit” night.


Celebrate Christmas Eve service at church with my family: This activity will not be affected, because our church, Second Baptist, is open! If yours is not, find one you can visit that is.


Take a night to drive around and look at Christmas lights: This is easy in a COVID world, and to add a little festivity to this year’s tour, we will be taking in the view from a horse drawn carriage.


Dinner out with a group of friends: In place of our many dinner parties, we have a small group coming over for dinner-in-a-box. We will sit outside by the fire and enjoy our socially distanced fellowship.


Night with husband watching old Christmas cartoons: Easy! No change needed for this one.


Day of rest in my plaid pajamas (a “do-nothing” day): Always!


Life changes, and you need to change with it. Happiness in our circumstances is a choice, and the holidays are a perfect time to practice making happy choices. This can only happen, though, if you make plans for what you want.


If you are in a season of life where the holidays bring sadness, then it is important you be intentional about what you expect to happen. If you have experienced a loss of any sort (death, divorce, even children leaving home), often the best alleviator of this pain is to find ways to serve others. When we step outside of ourselves and focus on the pain of those around us, it can be the best healing agent. Invite another acquaintance over for a glass of wine. Play Secret Santa in your neighborhood. Call a local homeless shelter and see what their needs are. A suffering world always needs help. Find your place and lend your hands.


No matter what situation you find yourself in this season, to wake up on New Year’s Day with a heart filled with joy, you must be intentional. Live with purpose, and make the holidays happen for you!


Together with you,

Lisa Lou